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Discover Oregon’s Natural Beauty at These 10 Campgrounds



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Where to Camp in the Beaver State

Oregon is widely considered one of the most beautiful states in the US, and is a popular tourist destination. Folks travel from far and wide to visit Oregon and enjoy its diverse landscape of mountains, forests and beaches. Hiking, fishing, and even whale watching are among the popular pastimes of locals and tourists alike.

No matter what your favorite outdoor activity is, you’re sure to have a great time on an Oregon camping trip. Here are our favorite campgrounds in Oregon.

1. Dorena Lake – Cottage Grove

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This area is a fabulous destination for your next Oregon vacation, day trip, wedding or family reunion. If you enjoy biking, hiking, camping, sightseeing, boating, water skiing, swimming or just being outdoors in an unmatched setting come to Dorena Lake and Cottage Grove. Learn more.

2. Cascadia State Park – Detroit

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The first thing that strikes you when you arrive at Cascadia is the tranquility. While the park is quite large, there are barely two dozen first-come first-served campsites, making this a great spot for an intimate getaway. The campground, group tent sites and east picnic area are open May 1-September 30. The west picnic area is open year-round. Learn more.

3. Oxbow Regional Park – Troutdale

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When you’ve had enough water, explore 15 miles of trails through Oxbow’s ancient forests. Reserve a camping spot for the night, and gather around the fire for nature activities and music. You might bump into mink, beavers, raccoons, fox, deer, osprey, songbirds, elk, black bears or cougars. Every fall, nature puts on one of its greatest shows: salmon return to their spawning grounds to lay their last eggs, before dying in the waters where they were born. Learn more.

4. Cape Lookout State Park – Tillamook

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A popular campground and day-use area, Cape Lookout is located on a sand spit between Netarts Bay and the ocean, giving you a terrific view of the ocean with easy access to the beach. Beachcombing is popular here, and the park is reputedly a good place to find glass floats. More than eight miles of hiking and walking trails wind through a lush old-growth forest. The Cape Lookout trail follows the headland for more than two miles. A bench is located at the end of the trail. Enjoy the view! You might see a whale or two along with other wildlife. Learn more.

5. Cape Perpetua – Yachats

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Towering trees looming through a coastal fog. Frothy surf crashing upon jagged shores. Majestic headlands offering clear views for miles. It all awaits you at the Cape Perpetua Scenic Area. Located three miles south of Yachats, this coastal wonderland – where the forest meets the sea – captivates locals and visitors alike. Learn more.

6. Harris Beach State Park – Brookings

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Harris Beach was named after the Scottish pioneer George Harris who settled here in the late 1880s to raise sheep and cattle.  The park boasts the largest island off the Oregon coast.  Bird Island (also called Goat Island) is a National Wildlife Sanctuary and breeding site for such rare birds as the tufted puffin.  The park offers sandy beaches interspersed with rocky outcroppings harboring interesting tidepools with their wide variety of life.  Sea stacks dot the ocean just off shore. Learn more.

7. Cove Creek – Mill City

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Cove Creek Campground rests on the shores of Detroit Lake at an elevation of 1,600 feet. Campsites are surrounded by towering trees, which create a secluded atmosphere. Visitors enjoy exploring the area and discovering osprey hovering above or nesting in many trees. Learn more.

8. Paradise in Oregon – Blue River

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Paradise Campground is indeed a paradise for campers. Tucked within a lush, old-growth forest of Douglas fir and western red cedar, the area portrays a sub-tropical vibe along the banks of the McKenzie River, where catch-and-release trout and steelhead fishing is a popular activity, along with whitewater rafting and kayaking. Learn more.

9. Valley of the Rogue State Park – Rogue River

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A pleasant green oasis awaits you in southern Oregon’s Rogue Valley. Valley of the Rogue Park has both a day-use picnic area and an overnight campground along three miles of shoreline on the Rogue River. A meeting hall is available for camping groups. An easy, self-guided interpretive walking trail provides a relaxing 1.25 mile stroll along the river’s edge. Learn more.

10. Big Lake – Coburg

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Big Lake Campground sits at its namesake lake along Santiam Pass, a 4,800-foot mountain pass through the Cascade Range in western Oregon. Campers enjoy views of the lake with the beautiful Mt. Washington as a backdrop. Learn more.

Do you have a favorite camping spot in Oregon that wasn’t included on this list? Let us know in the comments!

And be sure to check out the rest of our Best Campgrounds in the US series.

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